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The Development of British Naval Aviation, 1914-1918

The Development of British Naval Aviation, 1914-1918 PDF Author: ALEXANDER. HOWLETT
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780367650131
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 280

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Book Description
The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) revolutionised warfare at sea, on land, and in the air. This little-known naval aviation organisation introduced and operationalised aircraft carrier strike, aerial anti-submarine warfare, strategic bombing, and the air defence of the British Isles more than 20 years before the outbreak of the Second World War. Traditionally marginalised in a literature dominated by the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Air Force, the RNAS and its innovative practitioners nevertheless shaped the fundamentals of air power and contributed significantly to the Allied victory in the First World War. The Development of British Naval Aviation utilises archival documents and newly published research to resurrect the legacy of the RNAS and demonstrate its central role in Britain's war effort.

The Development of British Naval Aviation, 1914-1918

The Development of British Naval Aviation, 1914-1918 PDF Author: ALEXANDER. HOWLETT
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780367650131
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 280

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Book Description
The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) revolutionised warfare at sea, on land, and in the air. This little-known naval aviation organisation introduced and operationalised aircraft carrier strike, aerial anti-submarine warfare, strategic bombing, and the air defence of the British Isles more than 20 years before the outbreak of the Second World War. Traditionally marginalised in a literature dominated by the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Air Force, the RNAS and its innovative practitioners nevertheless shaped the fundamentals of air power and contributed significantly to the Allied victory in the First World War. The Development of British Naval Aviation utilises archival documents and newly published research to resurrect the legacy of the RNAS and demonstrate its central role in Britain's war effort.

The RNAS and the Birth of the Aircraft Carrier 1914-1918

The RNAS and the Birth of the Aircraft Carrier 1914-1918 PDF Author: Ian M. Burns
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781781553657
Category : Aircraft carriers
Languages : en
Pages : 208

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Book Description
The Royal Naval Air Service's origins were as the Naval Wing of the Royal Flying Corps in April 1912, but did not become a separate service until 1 July 1914. On the outbreak of war in 1914, the service expanded to include service on land, providing support of the Royal Naval Division in Belgium, to the RFC and as one of the early practitioners of strategic bombing. Yet, from its early days, the RNAS had set out to create a force operating aircraft in support of and in association with the Fleet. The RNAS and the Birth of the Aircraft Carrier 1914-1918 traces the development and operational use of aircraft serving with the fleet. It follows the training of personnel and the struggle to produce suitable aircraft and weapons, including the evolution of the aircraft carrier. Nonetheless, the constant thread throughout is the operational history of the RNAS over the North Sea with both the Grand Fleet and Harwich Force. Commencing over Cuxhaven on Christmas Day 1914 and ending with two pivotal operations which determined the future of naval aviation.

The Development of British Naval Aviation, 1914–1918

The Development of British Naval Aviation, 1914–1918 PDF Author: Alexander Howlett
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1000387615
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 276

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Book Description
The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) revolutionized warfare at sea, on land, and in the air. This little-known naval aviation organization introduced and operationalized aircraft carrier strike, aerial anti-submarine warfare, strategic bombing, and the air defence of the British Isles more than 20 years before the outbreak of the Second World War. Traditionally marginalized in a literature dominated by the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Air Force, the RNAS and its innovative practitioners, nevertheless, shaped the fundamentals of air power and contributed significantly to the Allied victory in the First World War. The Development of British Naval Aviation utilizes archival documents and newly published research to resurrect the legacy of the RNAS and demonstrate its central role in Britain’s war effort.

The Royal Navy's Air Service in the Great War

The Royal Navy's Air Service in the Great War PDF Author: David Hobbs
Publisher: Casemate Publishers
ISBN: 1848323506
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 480

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Book Description
In a few short years after 1914 the Royal Navy practically invented naval air warfare, not only producing the first effective aircraft carriers, but also pioneering most of the techniques and tactics that made naval air power a reality. By 1918 the RN was so far ahead of other navies that a US Navy observer sent to study the British use of aircraft at sea concluded that any discussion of the subject must first consider their methods. Indeed, by the time the war ended the RN was training for a carrier-borne attack by torpedo-bombers on the German fleet in its bases over two decades before the first successful employment of this tactic, against the Italians at Taranto.Following two previously well-received histories of British naval aviation, David Hobbs here turns his attention to the operational and technical achievements of the Royal Naval Air Service, both at sea and ashore, from 1914 to 1918. Detailed explanations of operations, the technology that underpinned them and the people who carried them out bring into sharp focus a revolutionary period of development that changed naval warfare forever. Controversially, the RNAS was subsumed into the newly created Royal Air Force in 1918, so as the centenary of its extinction approaches, this book is a timely reminder of its true significance.

Royal Naval Air Service Pilot 1914–18

Royal Naval Air Service Pilot 1914–18 PDF Author: Mark Barber
Publisher: Osprey Publishing
ISBN: 9781846039492
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 64

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Book Description
Osprey's survey of the Royal Naval Air Service pilot during World War I (1914-1918). In 1914 the Naval Wing of the Royal Flying Corps was subsumed into the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). With the bulk of the Royal Flying Corps engaged in France, the aircraft and seaplane pilots of the RNAS protected Britain from the deadly and terrifying Zeppelin menace. In 1915 the RNAS sent aircraft to support the operations in the Dardanelles, and also gave increasing support to the Royal Flying Corps units engaged on the Western Front, conducting reconnaissance, intelligence gathering and artillery spotting, bombing raids, and aerial combat with German pilots. This book explores all of these fascinating areas, and charts the pioneering role of the RNAS in military aviation.

The History of The War in the Air 1914- 1918

The History of The War in the Air 1914- 1918 PDF Author: Walter Raleigh
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1473850126
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 409

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Book Description
This magnificent and comprehensive volume was written in 1922 by Professor Walter Raleigh. Originally entitled The History of the War in the Air (Being the story of the part played in the Great War by the Royal Air Force) this all embracing and vital work features the most important account of the aerial battles, the men and the machines.Raleigh was Professor of English Literature at Glasgow University and Chair of English Literature at Oxford University. On the outbreak of the Great War he turned to the war as his primary subject. His finest book on the subject is this, the first volume of The War in the Air, which was an instant publishing success. Unfortunately the projected second volume was never completed as Raleigh died from typhoid (which he contracted during a visit to the Near East) in 1922. Nonetheless, Professor Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh has attained classic status as a result of this mighty work and this legendary volume ensures his status as a military author par excellence.

Britain's War At Sea, 1914-1918

Britain's War At Sea, 1914-1918 PDF Author: Greg Kennedy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317172213
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 232

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Book Description
In Britain, memory of the First World War remains dominated by the trench warfare of the Western Front. Yet, in 1914 when the country declared war, the overwhelming expectation was that Britain’s efforts would be primarily focussed on the sea. As such, this volume is a welcome corrective to what is arguably an historical neglect of the naval aspect of the Great War. As well as reassessing Britain’s war at sea between 1914 and 1918, underlining the oft neglected contribution of the blockade of the Central Powers to the ending of the war, the book also offers a case study in ideas about military planning for ’the next war’. Questions about how next wars are thought about, planned for and conceptualised, and then how reality actually influences that thinking, have long been - and remain - key concerns for governments and military strategists. The essays in this volume show what ’realities’ there are to think about and how significant or not the change from pre-war to war was. This is important not only for historians trying to understand events in the past, but also has lessons for contemporary strategic thinkers who are responsible for planning and preparing for possible future conflict. Britain’s pre-war naval planning provides a perfect example of just how complex and uncertain that process is. Building upon and advancing recent scholarship concerning the role of the navy in the First World War, this collection brings to full light the dominance of the maritime environment, for Britain, in that war and the lessons that has for historians and military planners.

To Rule the Winds

To Rule the Winds PDF Author: Michael C. Fox
Publisher: Helion & Company Limited
ISBN: 9781909982260
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 432

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Book Description
This second Volume in the To Rule the Winds series deals with the evolution of the Royal Flying Corps through the First World War and its transformation, in 1918, into the Royal Air Force. It focuses on the migration of the Army's Air Service - and to some extent the Navy's separate Air Service - towards a British Air Force intended to wipe the enemy's Air Service from the sky and provide an aerial umbrella under which the Army's Expeditionary Force on the ground could eventually move forward to victory. While the resulting Air Force was not entirely successful in the grand objective of ruling the air, it did enough. But to do so, it had to change fundamentally. In August 1914 the British Air Service - or, at least, the Army's Wing of it - that went to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force comprised four squadrons populated with a small collection of slow and unarmed reconnaissance airplanes, typically the Royal Aircraft Factory's B.E.2 types, plus an even smaller scattering of somewhat faster but still unarmed single seater scouting airplanes like the Bristol Scout and sundry Blériot types. There was no specialization worth the name: the airplanes of the Military Wing were just about all that were flyable; there was no plan for the future, precious little in the way of reserves and no duty other than to watch the enemy's forces on the ground. When the War ended in November 1918 there was a national, a Royal, Air Force of many squadrons: the Royal Naval Air Service had been (at least in principle and temporarily) rolled in; there were still the squadrons of reconnaissance machines, but faster, armed for defense and more robust. There were squadrons of bombing machines: like the reconnaissance machines, but more powerful and capable of carrying heavy bomb loads over distances that made strategic bombing a practical proposition. Finally, there were fighter squadrons, something of a real innovation, fast and maneuverable mostly single seater gun platforms. Although an Independent bomber force was created during 1918 there was not, even by the war's end, a fighter force - just squadrons. This Volume continues the underlying theme of the whole series: the development of the fighter force - a coordinated group of fighting squadrons adapted and later designed primarily to fight in the air against other airplanes.

Anti-submarine Warfare in World War I

Anti-submarine Warfare in World War I PDF Author: John Abbatiello
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780415512732
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 256

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Book Description
Investigating the employment of British aircraft against German submarines during the final years of the First World War, this new book places anti-submarine campaigns from the air in the wider history of the First World War. The Royal Naval Air Service invested heavily in aircraft of all types—aeroplanes, seaplanes, airships, and kite balloons—in order to counter the German U-boats. Under the Royal Air Force, the air campaign against U-boats continued uninterrupted. Aircraft bombed German U-boat bases in Flanders, conducted area and 'hunting' patrols around the coasts of Britain, and escorted merchant convoys to safety. Despite the fact that aircraft acting alone destroyed only one U-boat during the war, the overall contribution of naval aviation to foiling U-boat attacks was significant. Only five merchant vessels succumbed to submarine attack when convoyed by a combined air and surface escort during World War I. This book examines aircraft and weapons technology, aircrew training, and the aircraft production issues that shaped this campaign. Then, a close examination of anti-submarine operations—bombing, patrols, and escort—yields a significantly different judgment from existing interpretations of these operations. This study is the first to take an objective look at the writing and publication of the naval and air official histories as they told the story of naval aviation during the Great War. The author also examines the German view of aircraft effectiveness, through German actions, prisoner interrogations, official histories, and memoirs, to provide a comparative judgment. The conclusion closes with a brief narrative of post-war air anti-submarine developments and a summary of findings. Overall, the author concludes that despite the challenges of organization, training, and production the employment of aircraft against U-boats was largely successful during the Great War. This book will be of interest to historians of naval and air power history, as well as students of World War I and military history in general.

Samson and the Dunkirk Circus

Samson and the Dunkirk Circus PDF Author: John Jonah Oliver
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781973733515
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 220

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Book Description
This is the story of a small unit of 150 men of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and 450 men of the Royal Marines in the first few months of World War One, who travelled about France and Belgium terrorizing the German Army, to the extent that the Germans put a price on their heads! This RNAS unit was commanded by a man small in stature who was phased by nothing: he and his men just wanted to fight the Germans. They never had enough aircraft for all the pilots, so they started to look for a new way to take the fight to the Germans. They had heard about armoured cars in Belgium and set about designing their own. Lieutenant Commander Charles R Samson and his two brothers took the car out and went looking for a fight. They covered a lot of ground picking up intelligence and they had such fun doing it that they convinced the Admiralty to build them more armoured cars so they could take the fight to the enemy. They helped rescue thousands of French troops trapped in Douai and Belgium Troops trapped in Antwerp. They then helped push the German Army back at Ypres, during the First Battle of Ypres. Once the trenches had reached the coast there was not the freedom to roam looking for Germans, but they still carried out a lot of operations supporting the Belgian Army in attacking the enemy. In March 1915 the unit was pulled out of France and sent to the Dardanelles. This small unit was highly decorated for their bravery and yet they are in no official or unofficial histories. Their story has not been told and the development work they carried out has been ignored. The British Army and the Royal Air Force have taken credit for a number of the RNAS actions, innovations and discoveries, while the Royal Navy have just wiped their hands of these men.