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Hard Country

Hard Country PDF Author: Michael McGarrity
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 110158551X
Category : Fiction
Languages : en
Pages : 640

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Book Description
A richly authentic epic adventure of rough-hewn men and courageous women, set in the hard country of the American Southwest frontier. Hard Country is a rare and extraordinary story of one family’s struggle to settle and endure in the vast, untamed territory of New Mexico. In the wake of the death of his wife as she gives birth to his son, and the killing of his brother on the West Texas plains, John Kerney is forced to give up his ranch, leave his son behind, and strike out in search of the murderous outlaws and a place where he can start over. He drifts south until he meets a man who offers him work trailing cattle to the New Mexico Territory and forever changes his life. Spanning the years of 1875 to 1918, Hard Country is the Western reinvented and enlarged into a saga that above all celebrates the people and the land of the great Southwest.

Hard Country

Hard Country PDF Author: Michael McGarrity
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 110158551X
Category : Fiction
Languages : en
Pages : 640

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Book Description
A richly authentic epic adventure of rough-hewn men and courageous women, set in the hard country of the American Southwest frontier. Hard Country is a rare and extraordinary story of one family’s struggle to settle and endure in the vast, untamed territory of New Mexico. In the wake of the death of his wife as she gives birth to his son, and the killing of his brother on the West Texas plains, John Kerney is forced to give up his ranch, leave his son behind, and strike out in search of the murderous outlaws and a place where he can start over. He drifts south until he meets a man who offers him work trailing cattle to the New Mexico Territory and forever changes his life. Spanning the years of 1875 to 1918, Hard Country is the Western reinvented and enlarged into a saga that above all celebrates the people and the land of the great Southwest.

Pakistan: A Hard Country

Pakistan: A Hard Country PDF Author: Anatol Lieven
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141969296
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 592

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Book Description
DAILY TELEGRAPH and INDEPENDENT BOOKS OF THE YEAR LONGLISTED FOR THE ORWELL PRIZE 2012 2011 LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE FINALIST In the wake of Pakistan's development of nuclear weapons, unpoliceable border areas, shelter of the Afghan Taliban and Bin Laden, and the spread of terrorist attacks by groups based in Pakistan to London, Bombay and New York, there is a clear need to look further than the simple image of a failed state so often portrayed in the media, and to see instead a country of immense complexity and importance. Lieven's profound and sophisticated analysis paves the way for clearer understanding of this remarkable and highly contradictory country.

A Hard Country and a Lonely Place

A Hard Country and a Lonely Place PDF Author: William A. Link
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469644126
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 288

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Book Description
William Link's account of the transformation of Virginia's country schools between 1870 and 1920 fills important gaps in the history of education and the social history of the South. His theme is the impact of localism and community on the processes of public education -- first as a motive force in the spread of schooling, then as a powerful factor that collided with the goals of urban reformers. After the Civil War, localism dominated every dimension of education in rural Virginia and in the rural South. School expansion depended upon local enthusiasm and support, and rural education was increasingly integrated into this environment. These schools mirrored the values of the society. Drawing expertly from varied sources, Link recreates this local world: the ways in which schools were organized and governed, the experiences of teachers and students, and the impact of local control. In so doing, he reveals the harmony of the nineteenth-century, one-room school with its surrounding community. After 1900, the schools entered a long period of change. They became a prime target of urban social reformers who regarded localism as a corrosive force responsible for the South's weak political structure, racial tensions, and economic underdevelopment. School reformers began a process that ultimately reshaped every dimension of rural public education in Virginia. During the decades surrounding World War I they initiated sweeping changes in governance, curriculum, and teacher training that would have an impact for the next several generations. They also attempted -- for the most part successfully -- to impose a segregated pedagogy. Link carefully develops the role of the Virginia reformers, never assuming that reform and modernization were unmixed blessings. The reformers succeeded, he argues, only by recognizing the power and significance of local control and by respecting the strength of community influence over schools. Originally published in 1986. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Hard Country

Hard Country PDF Author: Sharon Doubiago
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 274

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Book Description
Since her childhood, Sharon Doubiago has sought to understand America in its dual relation as a haven of hope and a site of genocide. Hard Country is an epic poem in which the author, "an American Isis," travels over the land "in search of the lover strewn in pieces across it." Doubiago writes a major response to the male epic consciousness of 20th century American modernist poetry.

Creating Country Music

Creating Country Music PDF Author: Richard A. Peterson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226662855
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages : 306

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Book Description
This work traces the development of country music and its institutionalization from Fiddlin' John Carson's pioneering recordings in Atlanta in 1923 to the posthumous success of Hank Williams.

Dolly Parton, Gender, and Country Music

Dolly Parton, Gender, and Country Music PDF Author: LEIGH H. EDWARDS
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253031567
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 270

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Book Description
Dolly Parton is instantly recognizable for her iconic style and persona, but how did she create her enduring image? Dolly crafted her exaggerated appearance and stage personality by combining two opposing stereotypes—the innocent mountain girl and the voluptuous sex symbol. Emerging through her lyrics, personal stories, stage presence, and visual imagery, these wildly different gender tropes form a central part of Dolly’s media image and portrayal of herself as a star and celebrity. By developing a multilayered image and persona, Dolly both critiques representations of femininity in country music and attracts a diverse fan base ranging from country and pop music fans to feminists and gay rights advocates. In Dolly Parton, Gender, and Country Music, Leigh H. Edwards explores Dolly’s roles as musician, actor, author, philanthropist, and entrepreneur to show how Dolly’s gender subversion highlights the challenges that can be found even in the most seemingly traditional form of American popular music. As Dolly depicts herself as simultaneously "real" and "fake," she offers new perspectives on country music’s claims of authenticity.

All that Glitters

All that Glitters PDF Author: George H. Lewis
Publisher: Popular Press
ISBN: 9780879725747
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages : 340

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Book Description
This collection of essays examines modern country music in America, from its roots to today’s music. Contributors look at aspects of the music as diverse as the creation of country culture in the honky tonk; the development of the Nashville music industry; and why country music singers are similar to the English romantic poets. Historians, sociologists, musicologists, folklorists, anthropologists, ethnographers, communication specialists, and journalists are all represented.

Approaches to the Anglo and American Female Epic, 1621-1982

Approaches to the Anglo and American Female Epic, 1621-1982 PDF Author: Bernard Schweizer
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9780754654865
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 228

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Book Description
Epic has long been regarded as the exclusive domain of the male literary genius and as an incarnation of patriarchal values. This text challenges such a hegemonic stereotype by demonstrating the ways in which women writers have successfully adapted the masculine epic tradition to suit their own needs.

Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music

Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music PDF Author: Nadine Hubbs
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520280660
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages : 225

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Book Description
In her provocative new book Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music, Nadine Hubbs looks at how class and gender identity play out in one of America’s most culturally and politically charged forms of popular music. Skillfully weaving historical inquiry with an examination of classed cultural repertoires and close listening to country songs, Hubbs confronts the shifting and deeply entangled workings of taste, sexuality, and class politics. In Hubbs’s view, the popular phrase “I’ll listen to anything but country” allows middle-class Americans to declare inclusive “omnivore” musical tastes with one crucial exclusion: country, a music linked to low-status whites. Throughout Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music, Hubbs dissects this gesture, examining how provincial white working people have emerged since the 1970s as the face of American bigotry, particularly homophobia, with country music their audible emblem. Bringing together the redneck and the queer, Hubbs challenges the conventional wisdom and historical amnesia that frame white working folk as a perpetual bigot class. With a powerful combination of music criticism, cultural critique, and sociological analysis of contemporary class formation, Nadine Hubbs zeroes in on flawed assumptions about how country music models and mirrors white working-class identities. She particularly shows how dismissive, politically loaded middle-class discourses devalue country’s manifestations of working-class culture, politics, and values, and render working-class acceptance of queerness invisible. Lucid, important, and thought-provoking, this book is essential reading for students and scholars of American music, gender and sexuality, class, and pop culture.

Country Boys and Redneck Women

Country Boys and Redneck Women PDF Author: Diane Pecknold
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1496804929
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages : 304

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Book Description
Country music boasts a long tradition of rich, contradictory gender dynamics, creating a world where Kitty Wells could play the demure housewife and the honky-tonk angel simultaneously, Dolly Parton could move from traditionalist “girl singer” to outspoken trans rights advocate, and current radio playlists can alternate between the reckless masculinity of bro-country and the adolescent girlishness of Taylor Swift. In this follow-up volume to A Boy Named Sue, some of the leading authors in the field of country music studies reexamine the place of gender in country music, considering the ways country artists and listeners have negotiated gender and sexuality through their music and how gender has shaped the way that music is made and heard. In addition to shedding new light on such legends as Wells, Parton, Loretta Lynn, and Charley Pride, it traces more recent shifts in gender politics through the performances of such contemporary luminaries as Swift, Gretchen Wilson, and Blake Shelton. The book also explores the intersections of gender, race, class, and nationality in a host of less expected contexts, including the prisons of WWII-era Texas, where the members of the Goree All-Girl String Band became the unlikeliest of radio stars; the studios and offices of Plantation Records, where Jeannie C. Riley and Linda Martell challenged the social hierarchies of a changing South in the 1960s; and the burgeoning cities of present-day Brazil, where “college country” has become one way of negotiating masculinity in an age of economic and social instability.